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Jadwiga Brontē is a talented documentary photographer and filmmaker from Poland who currently based in London, UK. Jadwiga focused on politics, history, religion and human identity or a state of mind. For her new series “The Invisible People of Belarus”, Brontē documents the lives of disabled people and Chernobyl victims living in governmental institutions called “internats”, which are described as something between an asylum, orphanage and hospice. She explored the effects of the Chernobyl disaster on the people of Belarus more than 30 years later. Belarus suffered about 70% of the nuclear fallout.

Inside the lives of the disabled people and Chernobyl victims living in governmental institutions called ‘internats’ which is something between an asylum, orphanage and hospice. ‘Internats’ are hidden from public, and even some Belarusians themselves are unaware of there existence. These are places where tens of thousands of people spend their entire lives. Anyone considered as “different” by the Belarusian government can be removed from society and locked away.

Invisible People of Belarus is a story of us, human beings. People who suffer and struggle of the injustice of everyday life, but also about people who look after each other, who build long lasting friendships and fall in love. These invisible people will stay invisible, nobody shall remember, and a photograph might be the only remaining evidence of their existence.

-Jadwiga Brontē