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According to Houston-based Waste Management, every day people generate a volume of trash that weighs roughly as much as a million elephants. By 2050, if things don’t change, the plastic waste in the ocean will outweigh the fish. For human populations this translates into major health issues. The Belgian photographer Paul Bulteel is deeply interested in this problem, he visited more than 50 recycling facilities in Europe to document the waste we throw away. Paul takes on this task in a series of striking and highly illuminating photographs of what happens when our discarded paper, metal, glass, plastic, appliances, clothing and countless other industrial byproducts and leftovers are broken down and transformed into new materials.

Paul Bulteel is a talented Belgian photographer currently based in Edegem. He captures the interaction between people and our wider environment.

Waste: like the air we breathe, it is part of life. When badly managed, it destroys habitats on land, pollutes the air, and befouls our rivers and oceans. For human populations this translates into major health issues. Avoiding excess consumption and recycling waste are therefore crucial. But what does recycling really mean? Although the term is familiar, hardly anyone can form a mental picture of what recycling actually entails. Belgian photographer Paul Bulteel takes on this task in a series of striking and highly illuminating photographs of what happens when our discarded paper, metal, glass, plastic, appliances, clothing and countless other industrial byproducts and leftovers are broken down and transformed into new materials. Visually fascinating and well documented, these images give us food for thought.

Paul Bulteel

Sourse: The New Yorker