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Andrew Quilty is a award-winning photojournalist, who was born in 1981 in Sydney and currently based in Kabul, Afghanistan. Andrew studied Photography at The Sydney Institute of TAFE. His work have been published in The New York Times, The International Herald Tribune, The Wall Street Journal, TIME Magazine, Vanity Fair, Rolling Stone, The Times, Le Monde, GEO (France), The Guardian Weekend Magazine, Bloomberg Businessweek, The AFR Magazine, The Sydney Magazine, The Good Weekend, Art & Australia, The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, while recent essays have been published in The Australian Financial Review, The Big Issue and Photofile.

Since late 2013 Quilty has based himself in Afghanistan’s capital, Kabul and has also covered the story surrounding the emergence of the Islamic State in the Middle East extensively.

“Even as my plane climbed out of the Kabul valley, I felt a nostalgia for the place like I’d never experienced before,” he says. “A few people who’d spent time in Afghanistan before me had warned that it might get under my skin. I’d brushed it off at the time, but they’d been right. I packed up my things and headed back to Kabul indefinitely.”

A baby girl wrapped in foil after suffering burns from an oil heater. Despite the shocking appearance of the infant, Quilty later received news that the girl's injuries were not as bad as first thought.

A baby girl wrapped in foil after suffering burns from an oil heater. Despite the shocking appearance of the infant, Quilty later received news that the girl’s injuries were not as bad as first thought.

A ferryman in northeast Afghanistan who charges locals the equivalent of $0.40 to be paddled across the Kokcha River.

A ferryman in northeast Afghanistan who charges locals the equivalent of $0.40 to be paddled across the Kokcha River.

A fighting dog with his trainer in Kabul. Quilty says he prefers the softer light of Afghanistan to the hard Australian sun.

A fighting dog with his trainer in Kabul. Quilty says he prefers the softer light of Afghanistan to the hard Australian sun.

A newspaper printer snacks on a slice of watermelon on a summer night in Kabul.

A newspaper printer snacks on a slice of watermelon on a summer night in Kabul.

A roadside moment during a trip into Afghanistan’s Takhar Province. As a freelancer, Quilty is able to move more freely than many staff journalists but he lacks their security framework.

A roadside moment during a trip into Afghanistan’s Takhar Province. As a freelancer, Quilty is able to move more freely than many staff journalists but he lacks their security framework.

A young girl in a hospital waiting room in the aftermath of the Kunduz hospital attack.

A young girl in a hospital waiting room in the aftermath of the Kunduz hospital attack.

Crowds are one of the main concerns for foreigners in Afghanistan, and Quilty tries to make sure he is never surrounded.

Crowds are one of the main concerns for foreigners in Afghanistan, and Quilty tries to make sure he is never surrounded.

Father and son prepare a field for planting in the village of Salhad Breuhil, in Afghanistan's remote Wakhan Corridor.

Father and son prepare a field for planting in the village of Salhad Breuhil, in Afghanistan’s remote Wakhan Corridor.

History has trodden heavily through Afghanistan. In this image of a typically vigorous game of buzkashi, the participants wear what appear to be Soviet tank-crew helmets from the U.S.S.R

History has trodden heavily through Afghanistan. In this image of a typically vigorous game of buzkashi, the participants wear what appear to be Soviet tank-crew helmets from the U.S.S.R

In Kunduz, in the days after a Doctors Without Borders hospital was hit by a U.S. air strike, the young Australian managed to gain access to the destroyed facility.

In Kunduz, in the days after a Doctors Without Borders hospital was hit by a U.S. air strike, the young Australian managed to gain access to the destroyed facility.

Quilty on a shoot, dressed in local clothing. The 34-year-old says he has no plans to leave Afghanistan anytime soon.

Quilty on a shoot, dressed in local clothing. The 34-year-old says he has no plans to leave Afghanistan anytime soon.

Quilty's oceanic background also emerges when he talks about the risks in his (landlocked) new home.

Quilty’s oceanic background also emerges when he talks about the risks in his (landlocked) new home.

Snowfall at Nader Khan tomb, in Kabul. Quilty says his life in the Afghan capital is a more normal domestic life than most people would imagine.

Snowfall at Nader Khan tomb, in Kabul. Quilty says his life in the Afghan capital is a more normal domestic life than most people would imagine.

Villagers at the site of a landslide that buried at least 350 villagers in Afghanistan's Badakhshan region.

Villagers at the site of a landslide that buried at least 350 villagers in Afghanistan’s Badakhshan region.

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